Shock & Awe

Review: Shock & Awe: Operation Enduring Unity II by Richard Peters

Amateurs think tactics, dilettantes think strategy, and professionals think logistics.

Disrupting enemy supply chains is a one of the main elements of Peters’ novel. Given that both sides use the internet and speak the same language, it’s easier than in a lot of other wars.

ShockThe other big element is that the fortunes of war can change very quickly. Victory, in the propaganda and shooting wars, shifts rapidly here.

The first book used political analogies from history. This book uses battle analogies. The rebel URA mounts a Bay of Pigs style effort in Florida. Denver threatens to become Stalingrad as the USA attempts an invasion of its breakaway western states.

Peters also introduces some new weaponry that seems plausible. For all I know, you can already buy some of this stuff.

There is a bit of a secondary theme promoting the competency of women on the modern battlefield. We get a new character, Sergeant Danielle Walker, who is thoroughly professional and capable.

Even more battlefield mayhem than the first novel, and the introduction of various “insurgent groups” make this novel as enjoyable as the first.

Peters promises to wrap the story up with one more book which, given where he leaves the story, is going to be interesting.

Recommended as strongly as the first installment.

Minor Spoilers

Yes, the president’s first name does seem to be Barry. He seems somewhat reluctant to accept the sweeping powers Congress hands him, so Peters is not making the usual partisan attack.

Denver gets carpet bombed, and our young militia leader Sophie take on a bit of a, well, unpleasant taint when she yells, prior to battle, “For the Fatherland.” She almost orders the battlefield execution of a captured prisoner too.

 

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3 thoughts on “Shock & Awe

  1. Pingback: Tin Men | MarzAat

  2. Pingback: Opertion Enduring Unity | MarzAat

  3. Pingback: The Surge | MarzAat

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