“Decay and Disease in the Fiction of William Hope Hodgson”

Review: “Decay and Disease in the Fiction of William Hope Hodgson”, Sam Gafford, 2014.

Voices from the Borderland
Cover by Daniele Serra

According to Gafford, Hodgson biographer Samuel Moskowitz says Hodgon was a hypochondriac. He urged his brother not to use public toilet seats. He washed his hands after handling mail lest he be infected by germs, and he gargled frequently since his father died of throat cancer.

Gafford thinks these fears of decay and disease show up in Hodgson’s stories, particularly the fungal horrors in “The Voice in the Night” and “The Derelict”. Gafford also notes that Hodgson’s disgust with the food from his Mercantile Navy days may have led to the image of the couple in “The Voice in the Night” consuming the fungus.

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